Peter Garrett uses TV interview to say Kevin Rudd was a danger to China

Peter Garrett gets teary in a “tell-all” interview with Channel 7’s Sunday Night program. Photo: Sunday Night Peter Garrett in a “tell-all” interview with Channel 7’s Sunday Night program. Photo: Sunday Night
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Peter Garrett in a “tell-all” interview with Channel 7’s Sunday Night program. Photo: Sunday Night

Peter Garrett says Kevin Rudd was a danger to . Photo: Supplied

Peter Garrett has become the latest politician to pick at the scab of politics past, labelling Kevin Rudd a “megalomaniac” and saying the former Prime Minister put the safety of in jeopardy in a lengthy interview with Channel 7’s Sunday Night program.

The 25-minute interview, promoted as his first tell-all since leaving office, covered Garrett’s career as frontman of Midnight Oil, his activism, family life, eventual transition into politics, and his “sorrow” of having four people die as part of the “pink batts” insulation scheme.

The interview has aired just in time for the release of his biography Big Blue Sky on Wednesday.

In an extract from the memoir, read out by interviewer Melissa Doyle, Garrett wrote supporting Kevin Rudd was “certainly the biggest” mistake he made in his political career.

He didn’t back down from that position in the interview.

“I’ve been particularly strong in this book about leadership and Rudd’s leadership and I think it needed to be said,” Garrett said.

“I’m critical of him, that’s true, very critical, but I think for good reason.”

Another of his criticisms is that Mr Rudd jeopardised the safety of .

“It’s a big call, but I stand by it,” Garrett said. He added Mr Rudd treated people with “an enormous amount of contempt” and made “the business of the country almost ungovernable”.

When pushed on what danger he feared Mr Rudd posed, Garrett said the former PM was “unpredictable” and he didn’t know what he “could or would do”.

“I mean even with [John] Howard you know where he stood,” he said.

“I’m not a great fan of John Howard’s, and he wouldn’t be a great fan of mine, but that aspect of his Prime Ministership I sort of understand and respond to.”

However, not all the claims in the memoir were elaborated on.

One passage, which details an envelope full of cash Garrett says he received, was refuted on air. The claim begins with a statement that a “pro-pokies push” was led by current or former “Labor office-bearers”.

“The clubs were generous donors to candidates,” the passage continues.

“In fact, a ClubsNSW representative had given me an envelope full of cash at an early meet-the-candidates event for NSW MPs. When I realised what it was, I gave it back.”

When Doyle brought up the allegation, he stepped back from the claim, saying it was a cheque in the envelope, not cash, and he didn’t believe it was a bribe.

“I’ve never said it was and I’m not saying I’m under any pressure,” Garrett said.

“I think the important thing is to correct the record.”

Garrett also delved into his past, talking about his mother’s tragic death in a house fire that he managed to escape from.

“We were quite close, so it was a big period of grief and sorrow,” an emotional Garrett said, on the verge of tears.

“Ultimately I realised she left me with a great passion for life.”

His mother’s tragic death meant he felt for the families of men who died installing insulation, the program said.

“The fact that we had the death of four young kids in the insulation scheme that the government established to deal with the Global Financial Crisis, that was a lowlight in lots of ways,” he said.

“The obvious one was feeling sorrow and the hardness of parents losing someone in a government scheme which I was responsible for.”

To wrap up the illuminating interview, he categorically ruled out a return to politics and switched back to musician mode when asked if Midnight Oil would consider getting back together.

He conceded “if the stars lined up” it could be possible.

Lloyd Williams looks over his Melbourne Cup team from Coolmore at Werribee

Four-time Melbourne Cup winner Lloyd Williams. Photo: Sebastian CostanzoLloyd Williams has lauded Irish trainer Aidan O’Brien as he admired his latest Melbourne Cup hopes from afar at Werribee on Sunday morning, while ruling out having a Caulfield Cup runner.
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Williams, who has won the four Melbourne Cups with Just A Dash, What A Nuisance, Efficient and Green Moon, targets the race every year but has taken a different approach this year.

He bought shares in a group of horses from Coolmore, including Bondi Beach and Kingfisher, which arrived with the second shipment of raiders on Saturday.

“It is not very good to see your horses here, is it. It’s a bit like a jail,” said Williams, who made the trip to Werribee for a rare public appearance to visit his horses.

Williams held court in front of a small group on a viewing platform looking at Highland Reel, Coolmore’s Cox Plate fancy,  and Bondi Beach under saddle. They  both went out on the track briefly only 12 hours after arriving, while Kingfisher was restricted to walking amount the compound in a rug.

The former head of Crown Casino  spent time in Europe this year and watched O’Brien’s training methods and was pleased to be able to have horses in the Ballydoyle stable.

“In any of the business I have been in, Aidan shows the most attention to detail of anyone I have ever  met. He is amazing the way he trains and knows his horses,” Williams said. “His record is incredible. He has 245 group 1 wins and he is only 45, imagine what he can finish with.”

Williams’ Macedon Lodge operation has another Melbourne Cup prospect in Amralah, which was dominant in the Herbert Power Stakes on Saturday, earning exemption from the Caulfield Cup ballot.

But he won’t be running in the Caulfield Cup, Williams said. “His next run will be in either the Mackinnon [Stakes] or Melbourne Cup.  He won’t run in both, he will run in one and that will his last run for the spring.”

Amralah has 51.5kg in the Melbourne Cup and a penalty of 1.5kg would almost assure him in of a place in the Cup. Chief handicapper Greg Carpenter will announce a penalty on Monday.

Fawkner, which faded to run fifth in the Caulfield Stakes, had pulled up “a bit jarry” and had found the ground a bit hard, according to Williams.

Bondi Beach and Kingfisher are likely to head to Williams’ property after completing  their quarantine at Werribee.

He said three-year-old Bondi Beach had the right profile for the Melbourne Cup after his controversial second in the English St Leger last start. Kingfisher is a year older and the long, lean stayer was second to in the Irish Derby last year.

“He is your classic European stayer,” Williams said. “They are in good order, we have three weeks [from now]. When we can get out of jail here they will thrive. It will be good to get them to Macedon Lodge.”

‘My HSC results were average at best’: Mike Baird reassures students ahead of exams

Mike Baird with his future wife Kerryn shortly after he did his final exams. Photo: Facebook NSW Premier Mik Baird and his wife Kerryn as they look today.
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Gifted girls suffer the most stress, study findsClass of 95: Where are they now?Follow SMH Student on FacebookHSC Study Guide

When tens of thousands of students sit their first Higher School Certificate exam on Monday, they’ll have a high-profile supporter on their side: the NSW Premier.

In a Facebook post on Sunday night, Mike Baird shared some of his own academic history to help reassure students who will sit down for the first English paper at 10.20am.

“Back when I was in school, a typical report card said something like ‘Mike talks too much in class’,” the post said.

“Truth be told, I was much more interested in catching waves (and girls) than studying… and my HSC results were average at best.”

But his academic career didn’t define the rest of his life.

Shortly after his school days, he met his future wife Kerryn on a beach on the south coast and school was “suddenly a distant memory”.

“Here’s the truth of it… Life isn’t defined by your exams. It begins after they are finished,” Baird said.

“It’s always important to give everything you do your very best shot, but make sure you keep some perspective.

“When you walk out of that final exam, you’ve got the world at your feet… And most of us oldies will tell you that your best days are yet to come.”

He finished with a simple message: “Good luck guys”.

HSC exams begin tomorrow. Back when I was in school, a typical report card said something like “Mike talks too much in…Posted by Mike Baird on  Saturday, October 10, 2015

ATO to defend claims of creative accounting

The n Taxation Office has been unable to give a detailed breakdown on how it has calculated its savings. Photo: Louie Douvis More public service newsATO ‘unable to identify savings’
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The n Taxation Office will appear at the Fair Work Commission  this week to defend itself from union claims it is using dodgy figures to support a wage offer to its 21,000 public servants.

One workplace union has taken action at the Commission, alleging the ATO’s program of cuts will save it much more than the $96 million it has claimed during wage talks.

Any vote on the unpopular pay offer on the table will now be delayed until the Commission has heard the case and made a decision.

The Tax Office has offered staff a 4.5 per cent pay rise over three years, which it said would cost $96 million.Under the controversial bargaining rules set by the federal government, the pay increases offered to public servants must be linked to detailed productivity measures so it is clear how wage rises will be funded.

But like most departments and agencies, the ATO’s accountants have had a tough time putting together a package of “productivity offsets” they could get past the Finance Department and the n Public Service Commission, who are enforcing the financial side of the government’s policy.

In correspondence with its public servants and unions, the ATO has been unable to give a detailed breakdown on how it has calculated its $96 million in savings.

Instead, the Tax Office named general productivity initiatives, such as the ‘Reinventing the ATO’ reform program.

It also cited its moves to tackle its rampant sick leave problem, changes to flexible working hours of executive level 1 staff, and streamlining the enterprise agreement.

But when asked for a detailed breakdown of calculations, the ATO said it was “unable to identify savings which are directly attributable to each of the four components of new productivity savings”.

n Services Union official Jeff Lapidos​ has made it clear he believes the ATO was “plucking numbers out of the air”.

The union’s legal team will appear before the Commission in Melbourne on Wednesday and Thursday in an effort to convince the industrial tribunal to force the ATO to reveal the numbers behind its publicly stated costings.

“The hearing is about whether the ATO should be ordered to provide the ASU with information that would reveal the extent of the productivity and cost savings it expects to achieve over the next four years from its digital transformation program and from rationalising its accommodation holdings,” Mr Lapidos stated in a bulletin to his members.

“The ASU’s enterprise agreement negotiators believe the ATO expects to make far greater productivity and cost savings than it has revealed to its employees.

“We expect the provision of this information will enable us to negotiate a better outcome than currently proposed by the ATO.”

A Tax Office spokeswoman did not answer a question on whether the union official’s assertion was true, but said the office had made attempts to clarify its position with the ASU.

“The ATO has attempted on a number of occasions to clarify the various issues with the ASU and while progress was made, some differences on interpretation on several matters remain so there will now be a formal hearing at the Fair Work Commission on October 14 and 15, 2015,” she said.

Sydney FC’s forward line will be force to be reckoned with, says Graham Arnold

Head to head: Sydney FC’s George Blackwood deflects the ball against Melbourne City on Saturday.They might have failed to land the killer blow against Melbourne City on Saturday night but Sydney FC coach Graham Arnold believes it won’t be long before his attack is menacing A-League defences.
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Sydney should have emerged with all three points from the encounter against the league’s richest club after a dominant second half at Allianz Stadium but couldn’t convert a series of half chances, with Filip Holosko’s goal just before half-time cancelling out Wade Dekker’s opener.

Yet while their possession dominance did not yield three points, Arnold had no qualms with how his attack is shaping up, even without last season’s Golden Boot winner Marc Janko and pacy winger Bernie Ibini.  “It’s an exciting front line. Defending is easy but the fluency with the ball will take time.

“In my history as a coach, we start slow-ish and we build into the competition. By December, January we hit our straps and come home with a wet sail,” he said.

“I’m really excited about our front line. [Milos] Ninkovic showed some absolute quality. You’ve got [Alex] Brosque, Holosko, you’ve got Shane Smeltz.

“Then there’s young George Blackwood, who I think has a hell of a future in the game and you can bring someone like Matty Simon on who can terrorise people.”

Blackwood should have sealed the game for the hosts just before full-time when he was delivered a superb cross by Rhyan Grant, only for City goalkeeper Thomas Sorensen to deny him at close range. “It’s a learning process. When the ball comes across that way, the keeper is going to automatically  move across to cover his near post, so you hit it to the far post,” Arnold said. “That’s a lesson he’ll learn.  He showed some bright spots and he’s got a big future with us at Sydney.”

The good news for the Sky Blues is that Holosko has been cleared of serious injury, despite clutching his hamstring in the second half.

The club confirmed to Fairfax Media on Sunday it was no more than cramp and the Slovakian would be fit to face the Newcastle Jets next Saturday night.

Arnold said he was looking forward to the ex-Besiktas forward getting accustomed to the A-League.

“You’ve got a guy that’s come from a totally different competition, he’s got to get used to what’s around him,” he said.

“As an attacker especially, it’s about fluency. If you’re playing around people you’re not familiar with, it’s going to take time.

“He needs to get used to the runs we want him to make. Once he got the goal and the second half, while he was out there he was very good.”

The ever-versatile Grant had a solid game at left back and may be used again in coming weeks, with Arnold fuming at Alex Gersbach’s disrupted pre-season.

“Alex was away with the under-20s, he didn’t return until Thursday and didn’t train with us for two weeks. I worry about putting him out on the field. He had glandular fever, he had a hip flexor injury.

“The Young Socceroos still took him away and he twice played 60minutes. It killed his pre-season,” he said.

David Carney comes in from the cold to show true value

Nigel Boogaard cops a red card. Picture: Getty ImagesMATCH REPORT, PHOTOS
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ONE of the first things Scott Miller did after being appointed coach at the Newcastle Jets was ring David Carney.

Miller had returned to London to finalise his move to Newcastle. This couldn’t wait.

Carney, one of the highest-profile and highest-paid players at the Jets, had spent the second half of last season in the grandstand, ostracised for his part in a revolt against previous coach Phil Stubbins.

‘‘I rang David and we had a lengthy discussion about his ambition for the year and his commitment to the club,’’ Miller said after Carney helped inspire the Jets to a 2-1 win over Wellington on Sunday.

‘‘He demonstrated that to me in the phone call and we made an agreement with each other. He made a commitment to be an outstanding player in the A-League this year.’’

Revitalised, Carney worked hard in the off-season.

His vision and touch have always been top-notch.

Now his body is in the right shape to make the most of those technical attributes.

He showed signs in the pre-season, but that was just the entree. When it counted most – the real stuff – he delivered.

Carney put the Jets ahead in the 29th minute when he met a Lee Ki-je cross at the near post and glanced a header into the far corner.

It was his first goal for the Jets and first in the A-League since 2006.

The 31-year-old, who is part of the leadership group, backed up his goal with an assist in the 71st minute.

It was Carney at his best. Playing on the right, he cut back inside onto his favoured left foot and curled a perfectly weighted cross into the six-yard box for Milos Trifunovic to slip between Louis Fenton and Ben Sigmund and sidefoot home.

‘‘David Carney has come away with a goal and an assist in round one,’’ Miller said.

‘‘That’s the expectation levels I’m putting on him.’’

Miller was also pleased with Trifunovic.

Signed late last month, the Serbian has been with the Jets for only three weeks.

It was a difficult game for the frontman, given Wellington had 60 per cent of possession.

He missed an early opportunity on the break, miscuing a spectacular volley at the back post when a header looked more likely, but made amends with a poacher’s finish for the match-winner.

‘‘Scoring on debut, irrespective of possession, that means he is clinical,’’ Miller said. ‘‘With the chance early on he should have put his head on it.

‘‘It was a good move in terms of transition – key pass forward, breaking lines quickly and men in the box.

‘‘He was unlucky not to score then.

‘‘His touch at the start of that movement – he brought down a high ball with skill.

‘‘With an extra couple of games he will be rolling.’’

Roselands Shopping Centre celebrates 50 years of retail glory

Moore’s pharmacy delivery van at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening Chemist Photo: Peter Moxham
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Preparations at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening staff swimwear Photo: Peter Moxham

Modern grocery check-out at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening groceries supermarket Photo: Peter Moxham

Peter Stone and Ted Dietsch fitting the rose fountain at Sydney’s Roselands Shopping Centre on 8 October 1965.SMH NEWS Picture by GEOFF HENDERSON Retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening water feature Photo: Geoff Henderson

Vince Coletta (right) with his protege Frank Pelli. When Roselands shopping centre opened in 1965 his barbers wore white jackets with black bow ties and sharpened their razors on leather strops. Photo: Michele Mossop

Bow ties and cut-throat razors: Vince’s Hair Stylists at Roseland shopping centre in 1965. Photo: Supplied

Moore’s pharmacy delivery van at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening Chemist Photo: Peter Moxham

Preparations at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening staff swimwear Photo: Peter Moxham

Modern grocery check-out at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening groceries supermarket Photo: Peter Moxham

Peter Stone and Ted Dietsch fitting the rose fountain at Sydney’s Roselands Shopping Centre on 8 October 1965.SMH NEWS Picture by GEOFF HENDERSON Retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening water feature Photo: Geoff Henderson

Moore’s pharmacy delivery van at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening Chemist Photo: Peter Moxham

Preparations at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening staff swimwear Photo: Peter Moxham

Modern grocery check-out at the new Roselands Shopping Centre, pictured on 5 October 1965.SUN FEATURES Picture by PETER MOXHAM Sydney retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening groceries supermarket Photo: Peter Moxham

Peter Stone and Ted Dietsch fitting the rose fountain at Sydney’s Roselands Shopping Centre on 8 October 1965.SMH NEWS Picture by GEOFF HENDERSON Retail 1960s n retail hhollins opening water feature Photo: Geoff Henderson

They came from all over Sydney and beyond for a glimpse of it. The ladies wore hats and gloves and pantyhose. The men sweated in suits. Little girls twirled in frocks and their brothers had shiny shoes.

And they marvelled – at the “decked”, 15,000-space car park where they left their Holdens; at the Grace Bros. department store, the modern Coles New World supermarket and the 90 shops including Jolly Jumbuck lamb market, June Millinery and Edels Record Bar; at the gleaming escalators and the acres of spotless tiles; at Four Corners Gourmet (a “novel collection of eat-there or take-away restaurants and food bars”); and at the famous “raindrop fountain” and the catwalk crossing its “fashion pool” where “stop-and-look fashion parades” were held.

The premier of the day, Robert Askin, was clearly impressed too: when he opened the Roselands Shopping Centre 50 years ago on October 11, 1965, his speech took a florid turn. “The million-dollar spread of merchandise under this roof brings the city to the suburbs in a glittering way that must rival even the fabled Persian bazaars,” he said.

The Grace Bros. project was a retail game-changer – one of ‘s first shopping centres and the largest in the southern hemisphere. A Herald feature at the time of the opening noted: “The visitor’s first reaction to it is wonder. Wonder at the sort of courage that was needed to sink £6 million at a spot by-passed by commerce about half-way between Hurstville and Bankstown; respect for the men who had the necessary courage.”

Vince Coletta, who opened a men’s hair salon in the centre soon after it opened, recalls the centre’s managers as “very fussy” about the tenants they brought in.

“My salon was one of the best in Sydney; it was very elegant in those days,” says Abruzzo-born Coletta, who was 32 when he opened Vince’s Hair Stylists. His barbers wore white jackets with black-bow ties. They sharpened their cut-throat razors on leather strops and patted “Bay Rum” aftershave into freshly razored necks.

Coletta is now “60 plus 22”. In 1989, he passed his Roselands business, now the unisex F&V Hairdressing, to his one-time apprentice, Frank Pelli, but still goes to work every day at his salon in the Macquarie Centre.

Roselands was unashamedly aimed at the suburban housewife. “Focus for womenfolk”, read one heading in the Herald. The refrigerated butcher’s counter at Grace Bros. had a heated strip running along it so “madame” would not be cold while she did the shopping. Mothers anxious about leaving their offspring in the child-minding centre could glance at closed-circuit screens positioned through the centre beaming their children’s play. There was more than one butcher, more than one haberdashery – after all, “madame likes to compare competitive prices and qualities, to find some challenge to her bargaining skills”. The “rendezvous room” offered ironing facilities, showers and a powder room.

“In the early days it was considered … to be a great white elephant,” says Garry Welstead, whose parents, Cid and Phyllis, opened Centre Jewellers when Roselands launched. The store is now in the hands of a third generation – Garry’s children Toby and Joel.

“Roselands just knocked people’s socks off,” says Welstead. “The raindrop fountain was a spectacular thing and it became a meeting place.” He remembers the day Frank Sinatra popped in, the crowds, the shoppers hanging from the railings around the raindrop fountain to catch a glimpse of the singer.

He remembers his wedding reception after his marriage to his wife, Judy, in 1969: it was at the centre’s The Rose Room. He remembers the prawn cocktails and chicken maryland and steak diane. “The pièce de résistance was the bombe alaska for dessert!”

Roselands has undergone successive renovations which have erased all traces of its gloriously retro 1960s architectural heritage, including the raindrop fountain. “That was a disaster when they got rid of it,” laments Vince Coletta. “they should never have got rid of it.”

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Jets start 2015-16 season with a win over Wellington Phoenix

Jets start season with a win Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.
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Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

Scenes from the Jets V Wellington match on Sunday. Picture: Getty Images.

TweetFacebook Jets V WellingtonMATCH REPORT

​ROOKIE coach Scott Miller was always confident his unheralded Jets squad would deliver – even if they had to do it the hard way.

Newcastle held on for a 2-1 victory over Wellington Phoenix after being reduced to 10 men in a tense season opener at Westpac Stadium on Sunday.

Reborn winger David Carney and returning keeper Mark Birighitti were the heroes.

Carney scored a goal and set one up for new striker Milos Trifunovic, who was cleared to play only on Thursday.

Birighitti made a fine save to deny Roy Krishna from the penalty spot early in the second half when the score was 1-all, and made two more top-shelf stops as Newcastle clung to their lead after captain Nigel Boogaard was sent off in the 77th minute.

It was a triumphant start for Miller in the A-League.

Recommended by Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglou, the 34-year-old former Fulham assistant is the youngest coach in the A-League.

Postecoglou and England manager Roy Hodgson, a former boss at Fulham, were among a number of high-profile well-wishers to contact Miller in the lead-up to the game.

They would no doubt have taken satisfaction from his first-up win – as would the club’s potential new owner, Dundee United chairman Stephen Thompson, who watched the match on television.

Miller’s predecessor, Phil Stubbins, did not win his first game until round 11 last season and finished a disastrous campaign with just three victories and the wooden spoon.

‘‘I knew they could deliver, and they did it,’’ a delighted Miller said.

‘‘We have come to Wellington, probably the most challenging place in regards to travel. We have dealt with it, and we have won. Irrespective of last year, that is a big step for any club coming over here.

‘‘Wellington are a solid team. They play nice football and are very dangerous in the final third.

‘‘To break them down and actually come out with the result, considering the circumstances, I thought it was magnificent.

‘‘It underpins what we have been working on: organisation, commitment, passion and never giving up.’’

The Jets played the final 13 minutes a man down after skipper Boogaard was given a red card for a second bookable offence when he held back Krishna.

Boogaard received his first in the 52nd minute after Cameron Watson had fouled Phoenix fullback Louis Fenton.

The official match report indicated that both his cards were for holding.

‘‘I was slightly frustrated with a few of the decisions overall,’’ Miller said.

‘‘Nigel’s is one of those.

‘‘But it was his second yellow, and Nigel knows better.’’

The send-off did little to detract overly from the coach’s satisfaction.

‘‘We had a dance in the shed and sang, ‘This is how we do it,’’’ Miller said. ‘‘JP and I led that one. We got laughed out of the room.

‘‘That is what we are about.

‘‘We are here to enjoy life as well as our football.’’

Left back Lee Ki-je, Enver Alivodic and Daniel Mullen were the only survivors from the final game last season to start against the Phoenix.

After a nervous start, which included Cameron Watson clearing a Ben Sigmund header off the line, Lee help put the visitors ahead in 29th minute.

The nifty Korean produced some fancy footwork near the byline and whipped in a cross for Carney to glance into the net.

Phoenix dominated possession and hit back in first-half stoppage time when Roly Bonevacia made a late run into the box to meet a cutback from Michael McGlinchey.

His first-time shot deflected off the heel of Lee and snuck inside the right post.

In the end the visitors had Birighitti to thank for all three points.

Back from a loan stint in Italy, he dived to his right to deny Krishna from the penalty spot in the 47th minute, and then produced another diving effort in the 89th minute to parry away a Vince Lia drive.

‘‘Birighitti’s save was a turning point,’’ Miller said. ‘‘To save a penalty at any time gives you that confidence and momentum to move forward. I thought he was outstanding … with the whole performance, I thought to a man they were superb, even the substitutes.

‘‘The whole trip has been fantastic in terms of logistics. The entire staff deserve a rap. They have been outstanding all pre-season.’’

Phoenix coach Ernie Merrick was frustrated rather than disappointed.

‘‘We dominated possession, we passed the ball around well through the midfield and our defence were rock solid,’’ he said. ‘‘But it’s all about scoring goals.’’

PM lends weight to Canberra-led campaign to help 60,000 sick kids who are missing school

Co-founder of Missing School Inc, Megan Gilmour, at her home in Hawker with her son, Darcy, 15. Photo: Graham Tidy Co-founders of Missing School Inc, Megan Gilmour, left, and Gina Meyers at Megan’s home in Hawker. Megan’s son, Darcy, 15, missed 18 months of schooling due to various illnesses and their treatment. Photo: Graham Tidy
杭州楼凤

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will add his weight to the launch of a national campaign on Monday to help families of the 60,000 n children who miss classes at school while being treated for a serious illness.

The campaign will kick off at Parliament House in Canberra, led by three Canberra mothers whose children have been treated in Sydney for life-threatening illnesses.

In a remarkable coincidence, the children were all treated in the Turnbull Ward of the Sydney Children’s Hospital.

The women have formed Missing School Inc to push for leadership by the federal, state and territory governments to make sure seriously ill children remain connected to their schools while being treated in hospital.

Co-founder, Megan Gilmour of Hawker, said the lack of systematic support in schools left families trying to do it all on their own or relying on the goodwill of individual teachers.

“We want to see this started as a national conversation and not just something that would be nice to do,” she told Fairfax Media.

“What we found was that no agency in is actually counting these children and we had to estimate the number of kids who were affected.

“This issue is not being adequately addressed by state and territory education systems.”

The standards of schools in major hospitals varied widely, she said.

The group will release the first comprehensive report into the challenges facing children who miss school due to significant injury or illness.

The report by the n Research Alliance for Children and Youth estimates 60,000 sick children miss school in every year.

It recommends a system of counting these children and knowing where they are, maintaining dedicated two-way teacher contact and instruction and peer contact during the absence, and using technology to provide real-time virtual participation in the regular classroom.

CEO Dr Dianne Jackson said advances in medical technology meant more children were surviving illnesses that were previously incurable and unmanageable.

“Seriously sick kids need access to quality education if they are to have the same opportunities as other children and young people to fulfil their potential,” she said.

National Children’s Commissioner Megan Mitchell said tens of thousands of students face disadvantage because they miss school as a result of significant illness or injury.

“Academic achievement may be affected, school relationships can be disrupted, motivation and engagement diminished, and isolation from the school community and peer group can have a profound effect on social and emotional wellbeing,” she said.

“These reports will help us understand what’s happening and how we can best address the challenges that students face.

“But much more work is needed. We need to extend our research and ensure we work collaboratively with policymakers, professionals from the medical and education sectors and, most importantly, the students and their families.”

In his message of support for the launch, Mr Turnbull says many young people suffer conditions that take them away from school.

“Maintaining a connection with peers and friends during such times can be crucial for a student’s social and emotional wellbeing, while continuing academic progress is important for long-term commitment to learning,” he says.

“I commend everyone here today for your dedication to improving outcomes for children who miss school due to significant illness or injury.

“You are doing a wonderful job in raising awareness of this issue, as well as bringing hope and encouragement to many young ns, their families and carers. For that, you have my admiration and thanks.

“I wish the organisers and attendees of today’s event all the best as you continue this great work.”

Players and officials declare Hybrid Rugby game a success

Western Suburbs Captain Shannon Gallant looks for support. Photo: Wolter Peeters Ray Cashmere hits the advantage line. Photo: Wolter Peeters
杭州楼凤

Players and officials involved in the inaugural hybrid rugby match between Wests Magpies and Randwick are keen to play again during next year’s pre-season after hailing the concept a success.

Wests, whose team included former NRL stars John Skandalis, Bronson Harrison, Shannon Gallant and Ray Cashmere, ran out 47-19 winners over the Galloping Greens at Parramatta Stadium on Sunday in an entertaining match that encouraged organisers to continue with their quest to find a game combining the best of the two codes.

Their dream is eventually to pit the Wallabies and Kangaroos against each other in hybrid rugby, but the immediate plan is to stage another match before the start of the NRL and Super Rugby seasons, possibly between the same two teams as it took the players time to adapt to the rules.

“This game today sets up an absolute challenge for maybe some time in January, and I am sure that Randwick will come with their big guns, some of whom are in England now playing in the World Cup,” Hybrid Rugby chairman Phil Franks said.

“I’d really like to thank both clubs … who showed the ticker to turn up at this game today where others jumped under the carpet. They know what the potential is for this game. It was demonstrated here today in style.”

The match was played under league rules when the attacking team had the ball on their own side of halfway and union rules once they got inside the opposition’s half. There was also a shot clock, limiting the time in possession to 60 seconds.

Despite each team having 13 players, the Magpies initially struggled defensively as Randwick took advantage of an overlap created by their centres wrapping around to play outside each other, whereas their league opponents played centre-aside. However, by the end of the match the Galloping Greens were out on their feet from having to constantly move up and back 10metres in defence when Wests had the ball inside their own half.

“It was a little bit tricky, the league part blew us out a little bit there getting back the 10metres,” Randwick captain Dave Parsons said. “We stuck in there but Wests just finished too strong. I think we tried to play wide too quick but should have been a bit more direct.”

Most of the 10 tries came from broken play, such as a kick or an intercept, rather than any structured moves. Wests also had trouble retaining possession when they had to play rugby union rules and lay the ball back in the ruck.

“It was different for everybody and we all had to sit back and wait to see what was going to happen but the way it turned out I enjoyed it and I think everyone who played the game enjoyed it,” Magpies coach Leo Epifania said. “You would have to train constantly to get the knack of it but I just think both sides did their absolute best. We probably played better in the union half and they played better league than us in our half so we both obviously trained pretty hard.”

With each team scoring two converted first-half tries, the scores were level at 14-all at half-time but Wests got on top in the third quarter to lead 26-14, then ran away with the match in the fourth quarter.

“I am ready to go again next weekend,” said Gallant, the Magpies captain. “Come one or two more games we will definitely push some oppositions.”

Western Suburbs 47 (Todd Liubinskas 2, Tala Mapesone, John Skandalis, Tom Morrison, Shannon Gallant, Blake Sutton tries; Shannon Gallant 6 goals)  def Randwick 19  (Kieran Knight, Tom Molloy, Lachy Anderson tries; Nic Andrews, Tom Molloy goals).